Working with Rust

For a while I have been wanting to play with a new programming language. Professionally I work with Java, C#, Python and JavaScript and so I went looking for something complimentary to them.

My first stop was was Go. I started by implementing a vector space search in it which you can see here https://github.com/boyter/golangvectorspace

While I liked the syntax (I still cannot think in Go), the libraries and the performance I realized that Go is close to a hybrid of Java and Python for me. It has the performance of Java with the Python style syntax. This is fine but I really wanted to push what I already am familiar with.

I decided I would have a go at a much lower level language. This mean either C, C++, D or Rust. I had a quick tinker with D and while I liked it it felt a little like C#. Rather than go with C or C++ I decided to try Rust.

Not being familiar at all with Rust I decided rather than start with building a Vector Space in it I would run through a few of the Project Euler problems.

// If we list all the natural numbers below 10 that are multiples of 3 or 5, we get 3, 5, 6 and 9. The sum of these multiples is 23.
// Find the sum of all the multiples of 3 or 5 below 1000.
// Answer 233168
fn euler_1() -> i32 {
	let mut sum = 0;

	for i in 1..1000 {
		if i % 3 == 0 {
			sum += i;
		}
		else if i % 5 == 0 {
			sum += i;
		}
	}

	sum
}

The above is my answer to problem 1 using Rust. Pretty simple really and I only had to look up a few things from the guide. The below answer to question two was however a little more complex. I do like the functional approach iteration. While the below works, I suspect that it could be more idiomatic if rather than looping for the answer that I could chain a filter in there somehow.

// Each new term in the Fibonacci sequence is generated by adding the previous two terms. By starting with 1 and 2, the first 10 terms will be:
// 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, ...
// By considering the terms in the Fibonacci sequence whose values do not exceed four million, find the sum of the even-valued terms.
// Answer 4613732
fn euler_2() -> i32 {
	let mut v: Vec = Vec::new();
	v.push(1);
	v.push(2);

	let mut sum: i32 = v.iter().rev().take(2).sum();
	while sum < 4000000 {
		v.push(sum);
		sum = v.iter().rev().take(2).sum();
	}

	let mut answer: i32 = 0;
	for val in v.into_iter() {
		if val % 2 == 0 {
			answer += val
		}
	}

	answer
}

EDIT – Made it more idiomatic

// Each new term in the Fibonacci sequence is generated by adding the previous two terms. By starting with 1 and 2, the first 10 terms will be:
// 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, ...
// By considering the terms in the Fibonacci sequence whose values do not exceed four million, find the sum of the even-valued terms.
// Answer 4613732
fn euler_2() -> i32 {
	let mut v = vec![1,2];

	let mut sum: i32 = v.iter().rev().take(2).sum();
	while sum < 4000000 {
		v.push(sum);
		sum = v.iter().rev().take(2).sum();
	}

	let answer: i32 = v.into_iter().filter(|x| x % 2 == 0).sum();
	answer
}

My plan is to eventually work my way up to solving Problem 35 which was posted as one of the weekly quiz questions at work the other day. Hoping that with some free time I will be able to dip into Rust over the next few weeks. You can watch my progress if so inclined on Github https://github.com/boyter/working-with-rust